Tag Archives: Space Exploration

Back to the Moon For Good

The Africa2Moon Mission came along too late to enter the Google Lunar X-Prize but that is not to say that both the spirit and ingenuity of this unique competition has not inspired us.

In fact we are in regular communication with X-Prize contenders like Astrobotic! Just like these bleeding edge pioneers, we are also reliant on non-government funding & Donations.

The X-Prize team have produced an excellent feature & FULLDOME PLANETARIUM SHOW called:

Back To The Moon For Good – The New Space Race

OVERVIEW

In case you haven’t heard, the Moon is trending again… and in a big way. Like in the glory days of the 1960s and 1970s, our big white space neighbor is enjoying the attention of lunar explorers. Only this time, they’re going back to the moon for good. The award-winning 24-minute Google Lunar XPRIZE fulldome planetarium show, Back To The Moon For Good, chronicles teams around the world competing for the largest international incentivized prize in history, by landing a robotic spacecraft on the Moon. To win the $30 million Google Lunar XPRIZE, a team must land a robotic spacecraft on the Moon, navigate 500 meters over the lunar surface, and send video, images and data back to Earth. This global competition is designed to spark imagination and inspire a renewed commitment to space exploration, not by governments or countries – but by the citizens of the world.

LISTEN: The first person on MARS could be South African!

The Mars One project aims to establish a permanent human settlement on Mars by 2024. With over 200 000 initial applications, the Dutch-based venture has whittled down the most recent shortlist to 100. Nick Hamman on 5fm caught up with Adriana Marais, one of four South Africans left on the list.

Visit the MARS ONE website

View Nick’s Podcast’s

VIDEO: Official NASA Orion Flight Test

Orion blazed into the morning sky at 7:05 a.m. EST on Dec. 5, 2014, lifting off from Space Launch Complex 37 at Cape Canaveral Air Force Station in Florida on a United Launch Alliance Delta IV Heavy rocket. The Orion crew module splashed down approximately 4.5 hours later in the Pacific Ocean, 600 miles southwest of San Diego.

The test marked a major milestone on NASA’s Journey to Mars as the Orion spacecraft completed its first voyage to space, traveling farther than any spacecraft designed for astronauts has been in more than 40 years.

NASA Names HEOMD Chief Exploration Scientist

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Dr. Ben Bussey

The Human Exploration & Operations Mission Directorate of NASA recently announced Dr. Ben Bussey will be their Chief Exploration Scientist.

I’m pleased this announcement is out and thrilled to welcome Ben to the intersection of human exploration and space science! Congratulations Ben!

– John Connolly Outgoing Chief Exploration Scientist

Ben J. Bussey is a planetary scientist. He earned a Ph.D. in planetary geology at University College London, England. In 2001, during his post-doctorate work at the University of Hawaii, he joined the ANSMET (Antarctic Search for METeorites) expedition to recover meteorites from the Antarctic glaciers. He worked at the Lunar and Planetary Institute in Houston and the European Space Agency, before joining the Johns Hopkins University Applied Physics Laboratory and becoming a senior staff scientist at that facility.

Bussey is specialized in the remote sensing of the surfaces of planets. He participated in the Near-Earth Asteroid Rendezvous-Shoemaker (NEAR) mission as a research scholar at Northwestern University, and co-authored an atlas of the Moon based on data and images from the Clementine mission. He has a particular interest in the lunar poles, using the Clementine images to locate crater cold traps for hydrogen deposits and mapping the so-called peaks of eternal light.

Astronauts vs Space Travellers

“Did You Know?”

Astronauts are considered to only be professionals who have been trained by a manned spaceflight program to command, fly as a pilot, or serve as a crew member of a manned spacecraft.

Although many non-professional space travelers have been called astronauts after crossing the Karman Line at 100km high this is strictly not true.

There have been 568 Professional Astronauts to date: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/List_of_astronauts_by_name

For a list of all space travelers to date: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/List_of_space_travelers_by_name